A notebook with mockups

Making an interface is a time consuming task. Hardly any framework makes it as easy as they promise. And sometimes you just need to prototype an idea to see if it really works. That’s when different ways of prototyping come in handy. 😊 (more…)

A globe showing a part of North America

Languages can be grouped together in different ways. One can put languages together based on their family relation (e.g. Uralic languages, Indo-European languages) or the area where they are spoken. But maybe the most interesting and eye-opeing way of grouping them is by their morphology. As it turns out, there are only four morphological groups for languages and all spoken languages fall into one of them. (more…)

A green python ready to use HFST :-D

HFST (Helsinki Finite-State Transducer Technology) is a neat tool for modelling morphology of languages in a computational way. The problem is that currently, the Python API is under-documented. But fear not, in this post you will learn how to load optimised lookup files in Python and use them to analyse and generate word forms. 😃
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Eyeglasses on top of an empty notebook

Believe it or not, we have different kinds of memory systems in the brain. In this post, I am going to cover three of them: episodic, procedural and working memory. All of them serve for a different purpose, and research shows that they are independent. It’s perfectly possible to forget how your life has been so far and still remember how to play a piano. 😮 (more…)

A big city seen from a tall building

When making software, one will automatically want to believe in the result being useful. Why wouldn’t it be? After all, the software product is built to solve a task, so it should be useful for the task, right? This is not necessarily the case. Nielsen defines usefulness of software by two key terms: utility and usability. In this post, I am going to walk you through these concepts. 🚶🏼 (more…)

A playstation 4 controller

The Final Fantasy series has seen a lot changes over the years. If you like one game in the series, you might hate another. Square Enix has sure tried out different approaches in crafting an RPG battle system! And this time, for me, they had hit the spot once more.😃

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A new message on a phone screen

The biggest misconception about usability is that you would always need to have real test users to improve the user experience. There are however more economical ways to make improvements into your application’s user interface. Today we are going to take a look at workload and missing information content. (more…)

Statues of saints

I had taken quite a few courses in philosophy, but all I learned from them were long lists of great minds and what they think about the world. But somehow I didn’t feel quite satisfied. Was that it? Is philosophy just about knowing what others have thought before you? To know enough thinkers to have a name or two to drop in every single conversation? Then what’s the point, I wondered. (more…)

Force Android to switch to mobile internet on weak WiFi

My new phone has an awesome WiFi modem. 📡 The problem is that it’s a bit too good for it’s own sake. Whenever I walk away from my home, I will be offline for up to 50 meters from my place. This is because my Android phone is still connected to my home WiFi, but the signal is too weak to provide any internet access.

Luckily, the issue of your phone staying connected to a weak WiFi is extremely easy to solve. 😊 (more…)

Super Mario toy celebrating

Lately, I have put much thought into usability in video games. Back in the days, we were used to games being not-so-user-firendly. Such as Super Mario, a platformer that doesn’t let you save is just as usable as Microsoft Word without save feature. Of course, if you could save your progress anytime in Super Mario, it would be as usable as Word when it comes to saving, but it would take a part of the game out. It would become too easy if you never had to start from the beginning after dying. Therefore, there’s a tradeoff! 🤔 (more…)