A MacBook Pro with a photo editing software open

This post will include a tutorial for making tiled images by using Photoshop in addition to some of my own tiled images that are free to use. But first, I’ll give some background why this tutorial ended up in the positive blog. 😃

When I was a kid 👦🏼, I made games using a code-free tool called Clickteam Fusion. What games require is, of course, graphics and one way of getting them is by taking photos. 📸 Photos don’t usually make good game characters, but you can use them as background or texture for 3D objects. In such a use, you don’t usually want to use an entire picture but only a part of it, like the wooden material of your kitchen floor for instance. Then it would be nice that the same part of the picture could be repeated endlessly so that you could cover the floor of an entire 3D house with the picture of your own floor in such a way that it looks natural, i.e. that it is tiled. (more…)

people by the Eiffel tower in Paris

Today’s topic will take this blog a bit further away from the language geek theme established in the first posts.🤓 This won't be an in-depth review of the finest classical compositions made in France – not at all. Instead, I’ll highlight here two of my favorite French singers.😃

It’s also worth mentioning that I found these artists by listening to NRJ French. I like that particular internet radio station because they only play French songs.🎵 What could be a better way of improving French than that? (more…)

The flag of Swedish speaking Finns

This week’s post for a thing I like continues with the same “language geek” theme I established on my last post.🤓 Again it’s about what a language, namely Swedish, sounds like. But I’m not discussing just any kind of Swedish on this post, but the Swedish native to Finland, aka finlandssvenska.

(more…)

A Spanish city from top

The very first entry in my blog of positive thoughts deals with the aspect of Spanish I myself like the most. As the title suggests, I’m going to talk about phonetics; fricatives in particular.

Before I dive any deeper into the fricatives, I should explain the basics of phonetics first. Phonetics studies speech sounds, i.e. vowels and consonants in a language. In case of Spanish, most people might think that most of the time one letter equals one speech sound. So the letter b is pronounced as [b], the letter g as [g] and the letter d as [d]. The reality, however is not as simple. (more…)